Advanced Materials & Processes

FEB 2015

Covers developments in engineering materials selection, processing, fabrication, testing/characterization, materials engineering trends, and emerging technologies, industrial and consumer applications, as well as business and management trends

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as shear bands, kink bands result in large but limited local deformation, do not cause microstructural damage, and may even provide a beneficial mechanical re- sponse. Kink band formation allows for very large deformations at a constant stress, with neither a load drop nor an increase in engineering stress that would occur during homogenous deforma- tion [7] . Therefore, kink bands may prove beneficial for the design of energy ab- sorbing structures where large strain de- formation at a constant reaction force is a highly desirable mechanical response. SUMMARY Cu-Nb nanolaminates can be pro- duced in bulk form using the industry scalable ARB process. These materials display high strengths (>1 GPa) and show a strong propensity for kink band forma- tion during layer parallel compression. The combination of microstructural stability, high strength, and unusual de- formation behavior make metallic nano- laminates intriguing candidate materials for structural applications. ~AM&P For more information: Thomas Nizolek is a Ph.D. student at University of Califor- nia, Santa Barbara, tnizolek@engr.ucsb. edu, www.materials.ucsb.edu. This article has been adapted from a full length feature in Metallography, Microstruc- ture, and Analysis 3.6 (2014): 470-476, DOI 10.1007/s13632-014-0172-2. © Spring- er Science+Business Media New York and ASM International 2014. Acknowledgment T.N. was supported by the Department of Defense through the National Defense Sci- ence & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program. J.T.A., T.N., I.J.B, and T.M.P. wish to acknowledge support by the UC Lab Fees Research Program, Award #238091. References 1. N. Mara and I. Beyerlein, Review: Effect of Bimetal Interface Structure on the Mechanical Behavior of Cu-Nb fcc-bcc Nanolayered Composites, J. Mater. Sci., Vol 49(19), p 6497-6516, 2014. 2. M. Demkowicz, et al., Interface Structure and Radiation Damage Resistance in Cu- Nb Multilayer Nanocomposites. Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol 100(13), p 136102-136104, 2008. 3. M. Knezevic, et al., Texture Evolution in Two-Phase Zr/Nb Lamellar Composites During Accumulative Roll Bonding, Int. J. Plast., Vol 57, p 16-28, 2014. 4. K. Yasuna, et al., Bulk Metallic Multilayers Produced by Repeated Press-Rolling and Their Perpendicular Magnetoresistance, J. Appl. Phys., Vol 82(5), p 2435-2438, 1997. 5. L. Ghalandari and M. Moshksar, High- Strength and High-Conductive Cu/Ag Mul- tilayer Produced by ARB, J. Alloy. Compd., Vol 506(1), p 172-178, 2010. 6. I. Beyerlein, et al., Interface-Driven Mi- crostructure Development and Ultra High Strength of Bulk Nanostructured Cu-Nb Multilayers Fabricated by Severe Plastic Deformation, J. Mater. Res., Vol 28(13), p 1799-1822, 2013. 7. T. Nizolek, et al., Enhanced Plasticity via Kinking in Cubic Metallic Nanolam- inates, Adv. Engr. Mater., DOI: 10.1002/ adem.20400324, 2014. A D V A N C E D M A T E R I A L S & P R O C E S S E S | F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 2 1

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